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Caroline H.



Men’s Soccer Team Face Mounting Cheating Allegations


Members of the Sky High School men’s soccer team are facing accusations of cheating on a recent geometry final.


The men’s soccer team is no stranger to scandals. Last year, five students were caught cheating on a chemistry final. All athletes must maintain a C grade average or better to participate in games, and that school policy has been rumored to be the motivation behind these athletes’ academic dishonesty.


The entire men’s soccer team is in math teacher Delano F. Franklin’s geometry class. When it was announced that the recent test scores were peculiarly high, it prompted the Superhero Mathletes to come forward with what they had witnessed the day before the test. The Mathletes were almost done practicing when they saw two soccer players enter the math office.


Mathlete member Aidan P. Ryan said no one is typically in the office at 5 p.m, but he saw activity during that time.


“They walked in, came out with a sheet of paper, walked towards the direction of the library, and then came back pretty quickly with multiple sheets of paper in their hands,” Ryan said.


“It just seems fishy, like they went to make a copy of the exam,” he added.


There is no confirmation that the paper they took was indeed the answers, and despite numerous attempts, Franklin nor anyone in the math department agreed to give comment.


Principal Shera L. Avi-Yonah stated that the administration has launched an investigation into the incident.


“We do not tolerate and have never tolerated this kind of behavior in our community, but we must be able to prove these allegations are true beyond a reasonable doubt before we are able to discuss possible punishments,” Avi-Yonah said.


Men’s soccer coach Jonah S. Berger defended his players and said there is no definitive proof they cheated.


“They are some of the greatest boys I’ve ever had the pleasure of coaching,” Berger said. “They’re hardworking and honest.”


The players themselves on the team have not been reached for comment.


The alleged scandal has exacerbated a serious issue within the school: the alleged preferential treatment of elite student athletes. Various groups have vocally criticized the administration’s special treatment of certain athletes, which they attribute to the fact that these players generate large amounts of revenue for the school. The academic dishonesty case last year only resulted in a one-game suspension for the players involved, which many students and parents judged to be too lenient a punishment.


The special treatment does not extend to all teams, however. Women’s soccer coach Alexis A. Luther said, “The women’s soccer team has long been underfunded and underappreciated.”


“We have won multiple state championships, and still are not seen as equals with the men’s team.”


The Parent Teacher Association has started a petition to suspend the students involved with the latest cheating incident, demanding that the administration value honesty over profit. Other students in the geometry class were infuriated and disappointed since the high scores had ruined the curve.


“Maybe I should try out for soccer next year. They get whatever they want,” student Joshua O. Florence said.




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